Archive for Actors

The Tragedy of Richard III (Season 5, episode 6)

Directed by Jane Howell

Produced by Shaun Sutton
Taping dates: 31 March-6 April 1982
First transmitted in the UK: 23 January 1983
First transmitted in the US: 2 May 1983

Running Time (PAL DVD): 239 minutes

Peter Benson as the Ghost of Henry VI/Priest (uncredited)
Antony Brown as Sir Richard Ratcliffe
David Burke as Sir William Catesby
Michael Byrne as the Duke of Buckingham
Anne Carroll as Jane Shore
Paul Chapman as Earl Rivers/Archbishop of Canterbury (uncredited)
Ron Cook as Richard III
Rowena Cooper as Queen Elizabeth
Arthur Cox as Lord Grey/Lord Mayor of London/Sir Christopher (uncredited)
Annette Crosbie as the Duchess of York
David Daker as Lord Hastings
Brian Deacon as Henry, Earl of Richmond/Second Citizen
Jeremy Dimmick as Young Duke of York
Tenniel Evans as Lord Stanley/Archbishop of York
Derek Farr as Sir Robert Brackenbury/Earl of Surrey/Scrivener (uncredited)/Third Citizen (uncredited)/Bishop of Ely (uncredited)
Dorian Ford as Edward, Prince of Wales
Julia Foster as Margaret
Derek Fuke as Sir Thomas Vaughan/Second Murderer/Richard’s Fourth Messenger (uncredited)
Alex Guard as the Marquess of Dorset
Bernard Hill as First Murderer/Sir William Brandon (uncredited)/Sheriff of Wiltshire (uncredited)
Paul Jesson as George, Duke of Clarence/Pursuivant (uncredited)/Richard’s Third Messenger (uncredited)
Patsy Kensit as Lady Margaret Plantagenet
Rusty Livingston as Richard’s Page
Oengus MacNamara as Lord Lovell/Halberdier/Elizabeth’s Messenger (uncredited)/Richard’s First Messenger (uncredited)
Brian Protheroe as Edward IV/Sir Walter Herbert (uncredited)/Richard’s Second Messenger (uncredited)
Nick Reding as the Ghost of the Prince of Wales
Stephen Rooney as Edward Plantagenet
Zoë Wanamaker as Lady Anne
Mark Wing-Davey as Sir James Tyrell/Sir James Blunt (uncredited)/First Citizen (uncredited)
Peter Wyatt as the Duke of Norfolk/Keeper (uncredited)/Stanley’s Messenger (uncredited)

Cannes Awards 2012

Feature films

Palme d’Or
AMOUR (LOVE) directed by Michael HANEKE

Grand Prix
REALITY directed by Matteo GARRONE

Award for Best Director
Carlos REYGADAS for POST TENEBRAS LUX

Award for Best Screenplay
Cristian MUNGIU for DUPÃ DEALURI (BEYOND THE HILLS)

Award for Best Actress
Cristina FLUTUR in DUPÃ DEALURI (BEYOND THE HILLS) directed by Cristian MUNGIUCosmina STRATAN in DUPÃ DEALURI (BEYOND THE HILLS) directed by Cristian MUNGIU

Award for Best Actor
Mads MIKKELSEN in JAGTEN (THE HUNT) directed by Thomas VINTERBERG

Jury Prize
THE ANGELS’ SHARE directed by Ken LOACH

Short Films

Palme d’Or – Short Film
SESSIZ-BE DENG (SILENT) directed by L.Rezan YESILBAS

Un Certain Regard :

Un Certain Regard Special Distinction
DJECA (CHILDREN OF SARAJEVO) directed by Aida BEGIC

Un Certain Regard Award for Best Actress
À PERDRE LA RAISON played by Emilie DEQUENNE
LAURENCE ANYWAYS played by Suzanne CLÉMENT

Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize
LE GRAND SOIR directed by Gustave KERVERN, Benoît DELÉPINE

Prize of Un Certain Regard
DESPUÉS DE LUCIA directed by Michel FRANCO

Cinefondation :

1st Prize Cinéfondation
DOROGA NA (THE ROAD TO) directed by Taisia IGUMENTSEVA

2nd Prize – Cinéfondation
ABIGAIL directed by Matthew James REILLY

3rd Prize Cinéfondation
LOS ANFITRIONES (THE HOSTS) directed by Miguel Angel MOULET

Golden Camera :

Caméra d’or
BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD directed by Benh ZEITLIN

Andy Whitfield

It’s reported that Australian actor ‘Spartacus’ star Andy Whitfield died at 39 on Sunday, Sept. 11.

“We are deeply saddened by the loss of our dear friend and colleague, Andy Whitfield,” said Starz President and CEO Chris Albrecht in a statement.

“We were fortunate to have worked with Andy in ‘Spartacus’ and came to know that the man who played a champion on-screen was also a champion in his own life,” Albrecht continued. “Andy was an inspiration to all of us as he faced this very personal battle with courage, strength and grace. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family during this difficult time. He will live on in the hearts of his family, friends and fans.”

2004 All Saints Matthew Parkes “Opening Up” (season 2, episode 7)
2008 The Strip Charlie Palmer (season 1, episode 2)
(season 1, episode 7)
Packed to the Rafters Nick Leigh “All in the Planning” (season 1, episode 10)
McLeod’s Daughters Brett Samuels “Nowhere to Hide” (season 8, episode 4)
2010 Spartacus: Blood and Sand Spartacus Lead Role
2011 Spartacus: Gods of the Arena Spartacus (voice / uncredited) “The Bitter End” (season 1, episode 6)
Film
Year Title Role Notes
2007 Gabriel Gabriel Lead Role
2010 The Clinic Cameron Marshall

Patrick Swayze

LOS ANGELES, California- Patrick Swayze, whose good looks and sympathetic performances in films such as “Dirty Dancing” and “Ghost” made him a romantic idol to millions, died Monday. He was 57. Swayze died of pancreatic cancer, his publicist, Annett Wolf, told CNN.

Swayze’s doctor, Dr. George Fisher, revealed in early March 2008 that Swayze was suffering from the disease.
“Patrick Swayze passed away peacefully today with family at his side after facing the challenges of his illness for the last 20 months,” Wolf said in a statement Monday.

Most recently, Swayze starred in A&E Network’s “The Beast,” which debuted in January. He agreed to take the starring role of an undercover FBI agent before his diagnosis. The network agreed to shoot an entire season of the show after Swayze responded well to his cancer treatment.

In an interview with ABC’s Barbara Walters in January, Swayze said his work on that show was exhausting, requiring 12-hour workdays in Chicago, Illinois, doing his own stunts. But he said the show’s character “just felt right for my soul.”
If I leave this Earth, I want to leave this Earth just knowing I’ve tried to give something back and tried to do something worthwhile with myself,” Swayze told Walters, when asked why he decided to do the show. “And that keeps me going, that gets me up in the morning. My work … is my legacy.”

“The Beast” was canceled in June because of Swayze’s illness, after doctors told him the cancer had spread to his liver.
“We are saddened by the loss of one of our generation’s greatest talents and a member of the A&E family,” a statement from the network said. “Patrick’s work on ‘The Beast’ was an inspiration to us all. He will be greatly missed and our thoughts are with his wife, Lisa, and his entire family during this difficult time.”

Swayze was mostly known for a handful of supporting roles when he broke through with his performance as dance instructor Johnny Castle in 1987′s “Dirty Dancing.” Co-star Jennifer Grey, who played his young lover, Baby Houseman, in the film, described Swayze as “gorgeous and strong.”
“Patrick was a rare and beautiful combination of raw masculinity and amazing grace. … He was a real cowboy with a tender heart. He was fearless and insisted on always doing his own stunts, so it was not surprising to me that the war he waged on his cancer was so courageous and dignified,” Grey said in a statement Monday.

Three years after “Dirty Dancing,” he became an even bigger star with “Ghost,” in which he played an investment banker who dies and learns to tap into his unspoken feelings for his partner (Demi Moore). The film won Whoopi Goldberg an Oscar and helped make him People magazine’s “Sexiest Man Alive” in 1991.
“Patrick was a really good man, a funny man and one to whom I owe much that I can’t ever repay,” Goldberg said in a statement. “I believe in ‘Ghost’s’ message, so he’ll always be near.”

Swayze told Entertainment Weekly in 1990 that “the movies that have had the most powerful effects on my life have been about romantic characters.” He expanded on the effort he put into love scenes for People in 1991.
“It’s possibly the scariest thing I do,” he said, “doing something so personal and giving people out there the opportunity to see if you’re a good kisser or not.”

Patrick Wayne Swayze was born on August 18, 1952, in Houston, Texas. His father was an engineering draftsman; his mother was a ballet dancer and later the director of the Houston Ballet Dance Company.
Swayze’s career diminished in the late ’90s. He broke both legs in 1997 while making a film, “Letters From a Killer,” and went into rehab to overcome an admitted drinking problem.

In 2000, he was flying in his own twin-engine plane when the plane depressurized; Swayze landed in a housing development in Arizona. Though some witnesses say he appeared intoxicated, he was later revealed to have been suffering from hypoxia, related to the depressurization and his three-pack-a-day cigarette habit.
Swayze re-established his knack for picking sleepers with “Donnie Darko” (2001), the dark film about a troubled student that became a sensation on video. Swayze played a creepy motivational speaker and won raves for his performance.

Swayze’s more recent films included a TV version of “King Solomon’s Mines” and 2007′s “Christmas in Wonderland.”
Though he still had the power to make women’s hearts flutter — 22-year-old Scarlett Johansson, upon receiving Harvard’s Hasty Pudding Award in February 2007, said her dream date was “probably Patrick Swayze, my dream come true” — Swayze wasn’t too impressed with himself.
“Good-looking people turn me off,” he once said. “Myself included.”

Swayze is survived by his wife, Lisa, of over 30 years and his mother, Patsy.
sourse: http://www.tayyar.org/

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